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Table 3 Characteristics and formal training in end-of-life care among doctors (N = 390)

From: Knowledge and attitudes about end-of-life decisions, good death and principles of medical ethics among doctors in tertiary care hospitals in Sri Lanka: a cross-sectional study

Characteristics No. (%)
Current position  
 Senior house officer* 228 (58.5%)
 Registrar/resident 66 (16.9%)
 Senior registrar/chief resident 24 (6.2%)
 Consultant 72 (18.5%)
Males 226 (57.9%)
Have ever worked in an ICU setting 122 (31.3%)
Had undergraduate training in EOL care (n = 390)  
 Lectures 213 (54.6%)
 Small group discussions 114 (29.2%)
 Role play 57 (14.6%)
 One or more of the above methods 256 (65.6%)
Had in-service/postgraduate training in EOL care (n = 390)  
 Lectures 69 (17.7%)
 Small group discussions 47 (12.1%)
 Role play 25 (6.4%)
 Formal training sessions during overseas training 10 (2.6%)
 Local workshops/postgraduate course work 3 (0.8%)
 One or more of the above methods 107 (27.4%)
Either undergraduate or postgraduate or both 297 (76.2%)
EOL training perceived as adequate  
 Yes 123 (31.5%)
 No 178 (45.6%)
 Not certain 89 (22.8%)
Most preferred training method on managing EOL issues  
 Lectures 49 (12.6%)
 Small group discussions 98 (25.1%)
 Role play 107 (27.4%)
 Workshops/demonstrations 24 (6.2%)
 Clinical exposure/experience 31 (7.9%)
 Not certain 81 (20.8%)
  1. EOL end-of-life; ICU intensive care unit
  2. *Senior house-officer is the period of employment in a clinical setting immediately following internship and before enrolling into a postgraduate course