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Table 3 Perceptions and attitudes of physicians and nurses about involving patients and/or relatives in a DNAR decision

From: Do-not-attempt-resuscitation orders: attitudes, perceptions and practices of Swedish physicians and nurses

Questions All
(n = 522)
Physicians (n = 210) Nurses
(n = 312)
p value a
Should the patient’s opinion about DNAR always be requested on condition that the patient is capable of making a decision?     0.064
 Yes 417 (80.8) 157 (75.9) 260 (84.1)  
 No 44 (8.5) 22 (10.6) 22 (7.1)  
Uncertain 55 (10.6) 28 (13.5) 27 (8.7)  
Consider a situation in which the patient has expressed a strong desire to receive CPR in the event of sudden cardiac arrest. Should this desire always be respected?      < 0.001
 Yes 161 (31.3) 34 (16.4) 127 (41.2)  
 No 255 (49.5) 139 (67.2) 116 (37.7)  
 Uncertain 99 (19.2) 34 (16.4) 65 (21.1)  
Should the opinions of relatives about DNAR always be requested?     0.588
 Yes 319 (61.7) 124 (59.3) 195 (63.3)  
 No 97 (18.8) 40 (19.1) 57 (18.5)  
 Uncertain 101 (19.5) 45 (21.5) 56 (18.2)  
Should relatives be allowed to make DNAR decisions?      < 0.001
 Yes 74 (14.7) 17 (8.4) 57 (19.0)  
 No 350 (69.6) 169 (83.3) 181 (60.3)  
 Uncertain 79 (15.7) 17 (8.4) 62 (20.7)  
Do you think there are patients who want to be informed that a DNAR decision has been made by the physician in charge but who do not receive such information?     0.617
 Yes 422 (81.6) 173 (82.4) 249 (81.1)  
 No 14 (2.7) 7 (3.3) 7 (2.3)  
 Uncertain 81 (15.7) 30 (14.3) 51 (16.6)  
Do you think there are patients who are informed that a DNAR decision has been made by the physician in charge but who do not want such information?     0.002
 Yes 333 (65.0) 152 (74.2) 181 (59.0)  
 No 46 (9.0) 15 (7.3) 31 (10.1)  
 Uncertain 133 (26.0) 38 (18.5) 95 (30.9)  
  1. CPR, cardiopulmonary resuscitation; DNAR, do not attempt resuscitation
  2. aChi-square test