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Table 1 Participants of the interview study (names have been pseudonymized)

From: What is it like to use a BCI? – insights from an interview study with brain-computer interface users

Participants (name, age)DiagnosisTechnologies usedBCI technology (applications)Number of BCI (training) sessions
Stefan, 24generalized dystoniawheelchair, eye tracker, computerNIRS-BCI (Near-Infrared Spectroscopy), non-invasive1
Walter, 32muscle atrophywheelchair, email/typing and voice recognition software, computer, respiration apparatusP300-BCI (email-Software, Brain Painting), non-invasive3
Wolfgang, 31muscle atrophywheelchair, email/typing and voice recognition software, computer, respiration apparatusP300-BCI (email-Software, Brain Painting), non-invasive3
Karl, 46Duchenne muscle dystrophywheelchair, email/typing software, computer, respiration apparatusP300-BCI (email-Software, Brain Painting), non-invasiveCa. 20
Mrs. Edlinger, 77amyotrophic lateral sclerosiswheelchair, email/typing software, computer, BCIP300-BCI (Brain Painting), non-invasive> 100 (ongoing)
Rudi, 27tetraplegiawheelchair, computerMI-BCI (motor imagery) (BrainRunners), non-invasive> 50
Robert, 51paraplegiawheelchair, computerMI-BCI (+exoskeleton training), non-invasive> 50 (ongoing)
Neil, 30tetraplegiawheelchair, email/typing and voice recognition software, computerMI-BCI (+ robotic arm), invasive (implanted electrodes)> 50 (ongoing)
Nicole, 58spinocerebellar ataxiawheelchair, email/typing and voice recognition software, computer, respiration apparatusMI-BCI (+ robotic arm), invasive (implanted electrodes)> 100