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Table 1 Professional guidelines for the inclusion of psychosocial factors in transplant eligibility criteria

From: Transplant eligibility for patients with affective and psychotic disorders: a review of practices and a call for justice

Association Organ Contraindications
American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases (2013) Liver Absolute contraindications:
• None
Relative contraindications:
• Psychiatric illness: “There is no psychiatric disorder that is an absolute contraindication to transplantation” [8].
• Medical noncompliance: “Patients should be evaluated for and meet reasonable expectations for adherence to medical directives and mental health stability” [8].
• Poor social support: “Patients should have adequate social/caregiver support to provides the necessary assistance both while waitlisted and until independently functioning in the postoperative period” [8].
International Society for Heart and Lung Transplantation
(2016)
Heart Absolute contraindications:
• Medical noncompliance: “Patients who have demonstrated an inability to comply with drug therapy on multiple occasions should not receive transplantation” [9].
Relative contraindications:
• Poor social support: “Any patient for whom social supports are deemed insufficient to achieve compliant care in the outpatient setting may be regarded as having a relative contraindication to transplant” [9].
International Society for Heart and Lung Transplantation
(2014)
Lung Absolute contraindications:
• Medical noncompliance: “Psychiatric conditions associated with the inability to cooperate with the medical/allied health care team and/or adhere with complex medical therapy” [10].
• Poor social support: “Absence of an adequate or reliable social support system” [10].
Relative contraindications:
• None
American Society of Transplantation
(2001)
Kidney Absolute contraindications:
• None
Relative contraindications:
• Psychiatric illness: “Renal transplant candidates with a history of mental illness should undergo evaluation, counseling and, if necessary, treatment by appropriate mental health professionals prior to transplantation” [11].
• Medical noncompliance: “It is reasonable to delay transplantation for patients who, despite interventions, are not able to improve life-threatening, noncompliant behaviors” [11].